The Student Newspaper of Murray State

The Murray State News

The Murray State News

The Murray State News

Junior outfielder Dan Tauken hits the ball.
PHOTOS: Baseball drops midweek game to SEMO
Rebeca Mertins Chiodini, Photo Editor • April 18, 2024

After coming off a winning weekend away, the Murray State Baseball team lost in what started as a close battle in their midweek match up...

Beyoncés newest studio album Cowboy Carter brings discussions on what should be deemed country.
The News Reviews: 'Cowboy Carter' by Beyoncé
Ben Overby, Staff Writer • April 18, 2024

Beyoncé’s divisive new album “Cowboy Carter” is an uneven yet satisfying odyssey through the scope of American music. I wrote a previous...

Junior outfielder Dan Tauken hits the ball.
PHOTOS: Baseball drops midweek game to SEMO
Rebeca Mertins Chiodini, Photo Editor • April 18, 2024

After coming off a winning weekend away, the Murray State Baseball team lost in what started as a close battle in their midweek match up...

Beyoncés newest studio album Cowboy Carter brings discussions on what should be deemed country.
The News Reviews: 'Cowboy Carter' by Beyoncé
Ben Overby, Staff Writer • April 18, 2024

Beyoncé’s divisive new album “Cowboy Carter” is an uneven yet satisfying odyssey through the scope of American music. I wrote a previous...

Alumna advocates for community journalism

Evans+with+her+husband+Chris+and+daughter+Elliot%2C+after+the+Lady+Rockets+won+the+2nd+Region+All+A+Classic+in+January.+Photo+courtesy+of+Allison+Evans.+%0A
Evans with her husband Chris and daughter Elliot, after the Lady Rockets won the 2nd Region All A Classic in January. Photo courtesy of Allison Evans.

March is not only Women’s History Month but also Colon Cancer Awareness Month. As the owner and editor of The Crittenden Press, Allison Mick-Evans utilizes the paper as an outlet for inspiration amongst her community. As a colon cancer survivor, she has used this platform to do so much more.  

Evans’ journey into journalism began two generations before her, when her grandfather became the publisher of The Crittenden Press

“I hesitate to say that I would even be in the newspaper business if it weren’t for my family,” Evans said. 

As a third generation member of the journalism industry, teenager Evans was introduced into the paper during the ‘80s. Like today, she worked as a photographer for The Press.

Evans went to Western Kentucky University but transferred to Murray State after her first year. Being immediately placed into print journalism classes and having a deep-rooted history in news writing, she was undoubtedly going to serve as the editor for The Murray State News. Being editor of The Murray State News allowed Evans to be a strong female leader. However, she also had to navigate situations where, as a woman, she was not always comfortable.

“I had to go and cover the Board of Regents meetings, and talk about intimidating,’’ Evans said. “There may have been one woman on the board, but I can’t remember.” 

While covering meetings like the Board of Regents, Evans was put into a position that a young woman historically did not fit into. Regardless, she never allowed herself to submit and continuously persevered. 

“I just had to push through,” she said. “I had to learn to do the best I knew how even though I didn’t know how.”

Reflecting on how she overcame these challenging moments, Evans noted just how important the college experience was for her. 

“Every experience I had in college and as editor prepared me for all the more difficult things,” she said. 

Today, Evans owns and operates The Crittenden Press with her husband Chris Evans. Together they also have three children. A community-oriented family, they raised their children attending the Marion United Methodist Church and playing nearly every sport Crittenden County Schools had to offer. 

Being a mom, Evans has found some difficulty in reporting on the activities her children are involved in, but nonetheless has managed to find a balance. 

“There’s been many times since Elliot started playing high school ball that I’m playing mom, bookkeeper and photographer,” said Evans. “It’s hard sometimes when I’m on the sideline with my camera ‘cause I try not to be that annoying mom cheering for her, but I am a mom.” 

If being a female journalist and a multitasking mother wasn’t enough to be an inspiration in a small-town community, Evans photographing and reporting through chemo and becoming a colon cancer survivor sure was. Two years ago, during a routine colonoscopy, she received a life-altering diagnosis.

 “I had a portion of my colon removed and had six months of chemotherapy,” said Evans. 

Throughout her treatments and surgery, Evans remained steadfast in her commitment to her work. Working through chemotherapy she found herself getting worn out — but, as the strong woman she is, she found ways to work around it. 

“I worked mostly through the whole thing,” she said. “I was only off for a little bit post-surgery. Through chemo a lot of times, I found myself going to the back and taking a nap because I was just that tired.”

For the last two years, she has been using the paper as a platform to encourage others to prioritize screenings and early detection. From PSAs to her personal journey, she believes the Lord has put this obstacle in her path so that she could help others. 

“God put this in my path for a reason,” Evans said. “He has entrusted me to be an advocate for colon cancer awareness.” 

Through the pages of The Crittenden Press, Evans has shared her story, offering guidance to others who may face similar challenges.

Beyond her battle with cancer, her dedication to community involvement shines through in the paper. A primary motivator for her is the importance of having an informed community.

“I believe wholeheartedly in having an informed community,” she said. “Because of that, it is my goal for others to realize how important the newspaper is.”

Evans is an inspiration to her community, but without the long history of Crittenden County women before her, none of it would be the same. Women like Judy Winn cultivated the spark Evans has now when she was first out of college working full time for The Crittenden Press.

“She was an influential woman in the women’s club,” Evans said, “She fostered this love of community, and when I was covering those events fresh out of college, she instilled in me a need to love your community. Now, I feel a need to, (like her), encourage others… to buy into their community, be involved and know what is going on.” 

Other women, like her grandmother, made a life of faith and church involvement at the Marion United Methodist Church valuable to her. This in turn created a passion for her community. 

“The women in the church helped shape my character,” she said. “As far as community involvement, I think that part came from the church too. That’s where they expect you to help with things and be involved in the women’s organizations.”

Evans is a symbol of resilience and small community advocacy. From her early days as a part-time photographer to her role as editor for The Murray State News, she has stood as a strong female leader from the beginning. Now a mother, editor and cancer survivor, Evans is a woman who has the courage and perseverance to make a genuine mark in women’s history. 

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Laurel Brown, Contributing Writer

Comments (0)

All The Murray State News Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *